Since solar installations began there have been conflicting opinions on how corporate clients should approach the useful roof life for their building. Commercial roofs are typically warrantied for 20 years, and solar arrays are meant to remain in place for 25+ years.  This creates a difficult decision for companies who are looking at installing solar. Do you re-roof prior to installation to keep warranty periods closely aligned or do you move ahead with the solar installation and deal with future roof issues as they arise?  It is generally recommended by solar developers that if your roof has 10+ years of usable life left it is most cost effective to move ahead with a solar installation, and they are not wrong, but did you budget for a decommission and re-installation in year ten of your solar array’s life? Typically, no.

Decom Solar has worked with several clients who have faced this exact scenario and it is expected that this will continue to be a problem to solve in the industry.  There are several factors to consider when the time for a re-roof arrives.

Communicating with permitting agencies is of top priority when assessing a re-roof and reinstallation of solar equipment. Often, the local authorities may require you to bring your existing solar array up to current code, which can result in significant costs for engineering, equipment, and installation.

Coordination with your roofing partner is the next key step in keeping re-installation costs down.  Different roof applications require different installation methods and understanding how the construction of the new roof is being performed can bring creative re-installation solutions to the forefront, mitigating significant labor costs.

Local incentive programs can also impact company’s decisions on a best path forward.  If incentive structures are still very strong, it is worth considering installing a new solar array all together, which may drive significant financial returns for your business.

No matter the scenario, it is highly recommended that companies get ahead of these challenges so they can understand the associated costs and budget accordingly.  Avoiding a scenario where your roof is failing, and you need to scramble to solve the problem, is of the utmost importance.

Decom Solar can help system owners work through the challenges of decommissioning and recommissioning a solar installation.  We pride ourselves on understanding all aspects of solar installations and we have successfully worked with developers, permitting agencies, and roofing partners to develop cost-effective solutions for our clients.

Whether you are just starting to look at solar or already have solar installed, Decom Solar can help plan for your future re-roofing needs.  Visit www.decomsolar.com for more information.

A recently decommissioned 305 kW solar array is having a huge impact for the local community in Jackson, Mississippi.  Croda International partnered with Decom Solar to decommission a system located at their former headquarters in Edison, New Jersey. After determining that the modules could not be reutilized at Croda’s new Plainsboro facility, they worked with Decom Solar to find a non-profit partner who could benefit from the donation of the still useful equipment.

“For us (Decom Solar), Croda represents the exact type of client that we look for.  Their insistence on making sure that functioning solar materials were used to help those in need aligns with our mission, so it was a perfect fit for our organizations,” said Steve Burns, Co-Founder of Decom Solar.

Croda donated all modules, racking and inverters from their system to three organizations who are using the supplies to have a positive impact in Mississippi:

  • The Jackson Resource Center raises funds and awareness for the local homeless population and is helping to distribute the used solar modules to local non-profits.
  • The Mileston Cooperative Association is a large-scale vegetable-growing operations that serves the local community. The solar modules donated have been installed and are being used to power their hydroponics system.
  • Kinkead Housing Foundation supports and develops low-income multifamily housing. Kinead is currently installing these modules on top of homes for the less fortunate and having an impact offsetting what can be burdensome electricity costs.

“Often times it can be something as small as an electricity bill that can be overwhelming for individuals, so this donation is having a huge impact on the communities that we serve,” said Ms. White of the Kinead Housing Foundation.

Decom Solar specializes in the solar decommissioning for corporate and industrial system owners. They partner with non-profits and certified recyclers to ensure that any solar waste they touch is properly disposed or re-deployed.  Visit www.decomsolar.com for more information.